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Author Topic: Boat design  (Read 9162 times)

hunter13

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Boat design
« on: September 30, 2009, 01:22:21 »

I have a question. What boat design can hold the most weight?
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matt5674

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2009, 02:44:17 »

The Vermaas and Latitude are the largest ships, Latitude can hold tons of Crude Oil, and Vermaas can hold the most cargo of all of the ships in SS08. :thumbs: With the reduced draft on either large ship, the other is bound to be heavier.
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Capt. Matt

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2009, 02:45:19 »

Uhm I would think a VBottom as thats what most ships are made of  :P And matt I think he's talking about the design as thats what he said ::)
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Agent|Austin

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2009, 07:13:01 »

My favorite  :thumbs:
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McGherkin

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2009, 07:21:23 »

Wow... That's so...  Nautical! :2thumbs:
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Agent|Austin

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2009, 07:36:02 »

I know! It is my own design. :)

Imagine the bow splash!
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Sam

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2009, 08:22:34 »

Uhm I would think a VBottom as thats what most ships are made of  :P And matt I think he's talking about the design as thats what he said ::)

That is not correct, most cargo ships today are made of a flat bottom.
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Capt. Matt

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2009, 15:55:24 »

That is not correct, most cargo ships today are made of a flat bottom.

Shall I remind you of this topic http://www.shipsim.com/ShipSimForum/index.php/topic,16199.0.html

Oh and sure they may be flatbottoms but you get what point im trying to make  :P
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Sam

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2009, 07:05:08 »

What is wrong with that topic?

In Dutch leeway really is called drift, I just tought it would have te same meaning in English!

And I don't get your point biceaus most freightships really have a flat bottom and not a V-bottom.

Speedboats or for example fast crew suppliers have a V-bottom, but not freightships.
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TerryRussell

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2009, 23:29:57 »

None of them actually have a flat bottom, though. Speedboats (such as the ones I mess around in) have semi-displacement or planing hulls. These have very complex shapes with a predominantly V shape at the front (although it could be a cathedral hull or double cathedral or other shape, of course) , changing to a flatter, but not flat, hull at the stern. The hull includes all sorts of chines and risers and displacement guides so that the waterflow is deflected differently at different states of planing and so on.

Displacement hulls are also not flat and not exactly V shaped either. The hulls are profiled along their length to provide the best compromise between fuel efficiency, wave handling and cargo capacity (to name a very few of the many considerations). But they are not "flat".

It is much more complex than that.  :thumbs:

[edit in red]
« Last Edit: November 05, 2009, 13:11:35 by TerryRussell »
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Sam

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2009, 10:57:43 »

None of them actually have a flat bottom, though. Speedboats (such as the ones I mess around in) have semi-displacement or planing hulls. These have very complex shapes with a predominantly V shape at the front

Well, I shure agree with you on speedboats.
But allmost every freightship today has a flat bottom.
(Ok, they are rounded at the sides, but they still are pretty flat)

In the good old days, ships really had visible keel, but now it is just a stronger beam in the middle of the double bottom.

I don't really understand what you mean with non-displacement hulls.
Ok, a containership or a reefer is much more slender then for example a tanker or a bulker.

No mather how slender they are, they still have a pretty flat bottom in the middle
« Last Edit: November 05, 2009, 11:05:27 by Sam »
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TerryRussell

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2009, 13:12:26 »

Hi Sam.

I meant "displacement", sorry. Jet-lag is catching up, here in Boston.
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Ballast

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2009, 16:38:49 »

Interesting articel on Wikipedia about the ship's block coefficient (the shape of the hull).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_coefficient
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Stuart2007

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2009, 18:23:00 »

Terry, I think Sam is actually right on this. I forget the angle of the keel to be qualified as flat.

But a Vee becomes a deep Vee when the keel/lower hull is at less than 35 degrees. If it is greater than 35 but less than XX degrees, then I believe it is classed as flat bottom- even though it isn't really THAT flat, with a protruding keel.

My boat, despite being a bilge keel is actually (quite bizarre) theoretically a deep Vee which is perfectly pointless on a boat that won't go about 7 kts.
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LucAtC

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2009, 21:12:33 »

Hello Stu,
You are quite right, although I am not sure how you defined the angle. A clear explanation about the deadrise is given in this link, the angle being taken from the horizontal plane, from the flat of the keel to the start of the bilge.
The flat bottom is also, well, flat. Zero angle, and concerns of course only part of the bottom plating, otherwise it would be like Austin's ship, who gave the right answer, perhaps somewhat squarely as usual. Merchant ships have commonly flat bottoms, but there are indeed many more boats, whatever the definition, with flat or V bottoms.

The Vee of your boat was perhaps intended to give room for a possible propeller shaft, also helping to keep clean bilges?  8)
Regards,
Luc
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TerryRussell

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2009, 16:36:12 »

Terry, I think Sam is actually right on this. I forget the angle of the keel to be qualified as flat.

But a Vee becomes a deep Vee when the keel/lower hull is at less than 35 degrees. If it is greater than 35 but less than XX degrees, then I believe it is classed as flat bottom- even though it isn't really THAT flat, with a protruding keel.

My boat, despite being a bilge keel is actually (quite bizarre) theoretically a deep Vee which is perfectly pointless on a boat that won't go about 7 kts.

Yeah, that was my point. "Flat" hulled vessels are far from flat. They change profile along their length and there are some quite complicated engineering and maths involved. All sorts of gizmo shaping involved. I didn't want the casual reader to think that a flat hull is just a box with a propellor.

As Luc knows nothing is that simple with fluid mechanics/hrdrodynamics.  ;)
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Agent|Austin

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2009, 19:48:05 »

Yeah, that was my point. "Flat" hulled vessels are far from flat. They change profile along their length and there are some quite complicated engineering and maths involved. All sorts of gizmo shaping involved. I didn't want the casual reader to think that a flat hull is just a box with a propellor.

As Luc knows nothing is that simple with fluid mechanics/hrdrodynamics.  ;)

The FLAT hull I just modeled was pretty flat. :p
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TerryRussell

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2009, 20:04:35 »

The FLAT hull I just modeled was pretty flat. :p

Doesn't mean it was correct, though, does it?  ;D
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Stuart2007

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Re: Boat design
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2009, 08:33:38 »

I watched a programme on ITV604 which was about one of the RC XyZ of the seas.

They charted the evolution of liners/cruisers. It was quite interesting to listen to how the designers fixed parts of the hull (inc. length) to ensure that bow waves cancelled out the wake from the stern. Then how the bulbous bow was used for a similar purpose.

Another Great British invention ;)
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